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ASSOCIATED VOLUME
BIRDS OF AMERICA


SAMPLE  PAGES  &  TEXT
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Audubonn Ornithological Biography, Introductory Address.

 

Audubonn Ornithological Biography, Introductory Address.

 

Audubonn Ornithological Biography, Introductory Address.

 

Audubonn Ornithological Biography, Introductory Address.

 

Audubonn Ornithological Biography, Introductory Address.

 

Audubonn Ornithological Biography, Introductory Address.

 

Audubonn Ornithological Biography, Introductory Address.

 

Audubonn Ornithological Biography, Introductory Address.

 

Audubonn Ornithological Biography, Introductory Address.

 

Audubonn Ornithological Biography, Introductory Address.

 


ORNITHOLOGICAL BIOGRAPHY

John James Audubon

Edinburgh 1831 - 1839

The full title reads:

ORNITHOLOGICAL BIOGRPAHY
or an account of the habits of the
BIRDS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA;
Accompanied by Descriptions of the Objects Represented in the Work Entitled
THE BIRDS OF AMERICA
and Interspersed with Delineations of American Scenery and Manners.


This extensive work comprises 3,182 pages, including many, uncoloured wood-block illustrations mostly concerned with avian digestive tracts. Each volume describes a group of up to 100 plates from Birds of America in order of plate numbers, viz:

 

VOLUME Date First Plate Final Plate
ONE 1831 1 100
TWO 1834 101 200
THREE 1835 201 300
FOUR 1838 301 387
FIVE 1839 388 435 (at page 303)

 

Beyond page 435 of volume 5 are sections devoted to birds not illustrated in Birds of America together with corrections and updates to earlier descriptions under the general heading:

APPENDIX:
comprising
ADDITIONAL OBSERVATIONS
on the
HABITS, GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION and ANATOMICAL STRUCTURE
of the
BIRDS DESCRIBED IN THIS WORK:
together with
CORRECTIONS OF ERRORS RELATIVE TO THE SPECIES


Also included throughout the work are interesting anecdotes and descriptions of places visited and people met. These are of such quality that they could well have been used to create an entirely separate work that would most assuredly have been very popular.


Of particular note are the entries concerning Audubon's early years' attitude to wildlife - basically, if it had a pulse he would shoot it, regardless of its beauty, rarity, edibility or usefulness. He delighted in aiming his gun into a flock of birds just to see how many he could bring down with one shot. He was pleased with himself if he managed five or more. He describes in almost gleeful detail how he and his shooting his friends dealt with a large colony of Florida Cormorants: "The dead were seen floating on the water, the crippled making towards the open sea ..... In a short time the bottom of our boat was covered with the slain". He cared not in the least about the plight of the injured or maimed.


If you are of a delicate disposition this is not the book for you.